Board of Directors

As elected at AGM, January 15, 2015

President: Greg Fyffe

Vice-President: Thomas Juneau

Past President: R. Bruce Craig

Secretary-Treasurer: Laurie Storsater

Student Representative: Jeffrey Collins

Board Members: David Charters,  Arne Kislenko, Wesley Wark,  Gérard Hervouet, Robert Gordon, Alex Wilner.

Jeffrey F. Collins is a PhD Political Science (ABD) student at Carleton University. An experienced policy advisor and assistant at both the federal and provincial levels, Mr. Collins pursues research in Canadian defence policy and international security. He is currently a research associate with the Atlantic Institute for Market Studies. Mr. Collins earned a B.A. and a Certificate in Public Administration from Memorial University of Newfoundland, a LL.B (Commendation) from the University of Aberdeen, and a M.A.(Distinction) from the University of Birmingham. His worked has appeared in Foreign Policy Analysis, SITREP: Journal of the Royal Canadian Military Institute, Small Wars Journal, and the National Post. He lives in Prince Edward Island with his wife, Jenny.

David Charters is one of Canada’s foremost authorities on modern warfare, with particular expertise in the study of terrorism, countering terrorism, insurgency, counter-insurgency, and intelligence. He has taught, researched and published in the field for more than thirty years. Charters was a co-founder of UNB’s Centre for Conflict Studies, the predecessor of the Gregg Centre (Canada’s first research centre and sponsor of a scholarly journal devoted to the study of terrorism and low intensity conflict) and served as its director from 1986 to 2005. In addition to his academic teaching, he has served as a consultant to government and the media and has lectured frequently to professional audiences in the military, police and intelligence communities. From 2005 through 2008 Dr. Charters served on the federal government’s Advisory Council on National Security.

Robert J. Crawhall is Chief Operating Officer of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (www.cifar.ca). He has over 25 years’ experience working with leading researchers in the public and private sectors to advance and apply knowledge of importance to Canada and the world. Prior to joining CIFAR he worked in a number of sectors including aerospace, nanotechnology, telecommunications, eCommerce, energy and robotics. Robert previously served one year as Executive-in-Residence at the Telfer School of Management, University of Ottawa. He holds a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Ottawa as well as a Master’s degree in Electrical Engineering and a Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering, both from McGill University. He is a registered engineer in the province of Ontario and a certified project manager.

R. Bruce Craig is a specialist in the history of espionage. Craig has authored numerous popular and scholarly articles on Cold War espionage including the acclaimed book Treasonable Doubt: The Harry Dexter White Spy Case. Dr. Craig teaches American history at the University of Prince Edward Island; he is also a Fellow with the University of New Brunswick (Fredericton) Gregg Centre for the Study of War and Society.

Robert J. Crawhall is Chief Operating Officer of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (www.cifar.ca). He has over 25 years’ experience working with leading researchers in the public and private sectors to advance and apply knowledge of importance to Canada and the world. Prior to joining CIFAR he worked in a number of sectors including aerospace, nanotechnology, telecommunications, eCommerce, energy and robotics. Robert previously served one year as Executive-in-Residence at the Telfer School of Management, University of Ottawa. He holds a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Ottawa as well as a Master’s degree in Electrical Engineering and a Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering, both from McGill University. He is a registered engineer in the province of Ontario and a certified project manager.

Greg Fyffe  co-teaches a graduate course in Security and Intelligence at the University of Ottawa. He also co-teaches professional development courses in security and intelligence, and strategic thinking. From 2000 to 2008 he was Executive Director of the Intelligence Assessment Secretariat in the Privy Council Office. He is a consultant and editor on security and intelligence issues.

Robert W. (Bob) Gordon  Bob is the Executive Director, Canadian Cyber Threat Exchange (CCTX) where he has organizational responsibility to deliver cyber threat information services and lead all cyber intelligence engagements and research activities.  Most recently, Bob was a Director, Global Cyber Security at CGI.  Prior to this, he enjoyed a long and successful career in the Federal Government, which included being the architect of Canada’s Cyber Security Strategy.

Bob has had a unique career in Canada’s security, intelligence and law enforcement organizations: Public Safety Canada, Communications Security Establishment, Canadian Security Intelligence Service, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.  He has had senior executive responsibility for science and technology, IM/IT, and internal security programs (personnel, physical, and information technology).  He has also provided operational leadership in investigating and analyzing the full range of threats to the security of Canada, which included leading the CSIS Counter Terrorism program.

Aurélie Campana is Professor of Political Science at Université Laval, Quebec City. She hold the Canada Research Chair on Conflicts and Terrorism from 2007 to 2017. She is also  associate director of the Canadian Research Network on Terrorism, Security and Society (TSAS); a member of Institut Québécois des Hautes Études Internationales (Université  Laval), as well as member of the Centre International de Criminologie Comparée (U. of Montreal). Her research has focused for years on terrorism in internal conflicts, the    diffusion of violence across movements and borders, radicalization and discourses on terrorism and counterterrorism. She is also working, in collaboration with Samuel Tanner   and Stéphane Leman-Langlois, on far-right extremism in Canada. Her research appeared in numerous journals, including Civil Wars, Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, Terrorism and Political Violence and Critical Studies on Terrorism.

Professeure titulaire au Département de science politique de l’Université Laval et titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada sur les conflits et le terrorisme (Canada/France)

Aurélie Campana is Professor of Political Science at Université Laval, Quebec City. She holds the Canada Research Chair on Conflicts and Terrorism since 2007. She is also associate director of the the Canadian Research Network on Terrorism, Security and Society (TSAS); a member of Institut Québécois des Hautes Études Internationales (Université Laval), as well as member of the Centre International de Criminologie Comparée (U. of Montreal). Her research has focused for years on terrorism in internal conflicts, the diffusion of violence across movements and borders, radicalization and discourses on terrorism and counterterrorism. She is also working, in collaboration with Samuel Tanner and Stéphane Leman-Langlois, on far-right extremism in Canada. Her research appeared in numerous journals, including Civil WarsStudies in Conflict and TerrorismTerrorism and Political Violence and Critical Studies on Terrorism.

Thomas Juneau is an assistant professor at the University of Ottawa’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. His research focuses mostly on the Middle East, in particular on Iran, Yemen, Syria and US foreign policy in the region. He is also interested in Canadian foreign and defence policy and methods of strategic analysis. He is the author of Squandered Opportunity: Neoclassical realism and Iranian foreign policy (Stanford University Press, 2015), co-editor of Iranian Foreign Policy since 2001: Alone in the world (Routledge, 2013), and co-editor of Asie centrale et Caucase: Une sécurité mondialisée (Presses de l’Université Laval, 2004). He has also published many articles and book chapters on the Middle East, international relations theories and pedagogical methods, notably in International Studies Perspectives, Middle East Policy and Orbis. Prior to joining the University of Ottawa, he worked for the Department of National Defence from 2003 to 2014, chiefly as a strategic analyst covering the Middle East. He was also a policy officer and an assistant to the deputy minister.

Thomas Juneau est professeur adjoint à l’École supérieure d’affaires publiques et internationales de l’Université d’Ottawa. Ses intérêts de recherche portent principalement sur le Moyen-Orient, en particulier sur l’Iran, le Yémen, la Syrie et la politique étrangère américaine dans la région. Il s’intéresse également à la politique étrangère et de défense du Canada et aux méthodes d’analyse stratégique. Il est l’auteur de Squandered Opportunity : Neoclassical realism and Iranian foreign policy (Stanford University Press, 2015), le co-éditeur de Iranian Foreign Policy since 2001 : Alone in the world (Routledge, 2013), et le co-éditeur de Asie centrale et Caucase: Une sécurité mondialisée (Presses de l’Université Laval, 2004). Il a également publié de nombreux articles et chapitres de livres sur le Moyen-Orient, les théories de relations internationales et les méthodes pédagogiques, notamment dans International Studies Perspectives, Middle East Policy et Orbis. Avant de se joindre à l’Université d’Ottawa, il a travaillé au ministère de la Défense nationale de 2003 à 2014, principalement comme analyste stratégique sur le Moyen-Orient. Il y a également été analyste politique et adjoint du sous-minister.

PUL, 2004. L’Asie menacée, Presses de science-po, Paris, 2002.

Arne Kislenko has been recognized widely for his teaching skills, including being awarded the prestigious 3M National Teaching Fellowship in 2011. Arne’s other awards include being named the “Best Lecturer in Ontario” by TV Ontario viewers following the first Big Ideas “Academic Idol” television series in 2005. He also received Ryerson University’s first President’s Teaching Award in 2007 and the Ontario government’s inaugural Leadership in Faculty Teaching Award (LIFT) the same year. In 2006 he was inducted as an Honorary Member of the Golden Key International Honour Society and won the Ryerson GREET teaching award in Arts in 1999. Dr. Kislenko serves from time to time as a Visiting Professor at Freie Universitat Berlin, and is an Adjunct Professor in International Relations at Trinity College, University of Toronto. His publications include Culture and Customs of Laos (2009), Culture and Customs of Thailand (2004), and The Uneasy Century: International Relations, 1900-1990 (1996, with Margaret MacMillan). He contributed to, and helped edit, Global Perspectives on the United States: Issues and Ideas Shaping International Relations (2008). Recently he helped curate Ryerson’s Black Star photographic exhibit of the Berlin Wall, unveiled at the Canadian Embassy in the German capital to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Wall’s collapse. He also has contributed chapters to several books and published numerous journal and encyclopaedia articles on a wide range of topics in modern international relations history and intelligence and security studies. Dr. Kislenko worked as a Senior Officer with Canada Immigration at Lester B. Pearson Airport between 1989 and 2001, dealing with many high profile national security cases. He appears regularly in the media where he comments on current affairs, including U.S. foreign policy, national security and intelligence, terrorism, immigration, and modern diplomatic history. Dr. Kislenko also is a member of the graduate faculty.

Laurie Storsater retired from the Federal government in 2011.  He worked at the Public Archives, External Affairs, Solicitor General, Immigration, Privy Council Office and the Communications Security Establishment.  During his career, he served for 12 years at the Canadian Embassies and High Commissions in Lima, Rome, New Delhi, and Washington DC.  At PCO, he was in charge of the foreign intelligence section in the Security & Intelligence Secretariat.  During his assignment in Washington, he headed the Canadian Special Liaison Office — CANSLO(W) — at NSA.

Wesley Wark is a professor at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, where he has taught since 1988, and is also a visiting research professor at the University of Ottawa’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. He is Past-President of the Canadian Association for Security and Intelligence Studies (1998-2000 and 2004-2006). He served for two terms on the Prime Minister’s Advisory Council on National Security (2005-2009) and served on the Advisory Committee to the President of the Canada Border Services Agency from 2006 to 2010. Professor Wark’s most recent book is an edited volume: Secret Intelligence: A Reader (2009) He is the author of a classified history of the Canadian intelligence community in the Cold War. Professor Wark has published extensively in the field of intelligence and security studies over the past 29 years. Professor Wark writes and comments extensively for the Canadian and international media on issues relating to intelligence, national security and terrorism. He is currently completing a book under contract for Blackwell/Wiley’s on Spy Power—a history of intelligence and international relations from 1900 to the present. He recently completed a paper for the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada on communications intelligence and its implications for privacy in a post 9/11 age. Professor Wark earned a B.A. from Carleton University (1975), an M.A. from Cambridge University (1977) and a Ph.D. from the London School of Economics (LSE) in 1984.

Alex Wilner  Dr. Alex S. Wilner is an Assistant Professor of International Affairs at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University, Ottawa. He teaches classes on terrorism and violent radicalization, intelligence in international affairs, strategic foresight in international security, and a capstone course on Canadian security policy that has included research partnerships with FINTRAC, Public Safety Canada, Global Affairs Canada, Policy Horizons Canada, the Bank of Canada, and Ontario’s Office of the Provincial Security Advisor. Professor Wilner’s research focuses on the application of deterrence theory to contemporary security issues, like terrorism, radicalization, organized crime, cyber threats, and proliferation. His books include Deterring Rational Fanatics (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015) and Deterring Terrorism: Theory and Practice (eds., Stanford University Press, 2012). He has published articles in International SecurityNYU Journal of International Law and PoliticsSecurity StudiesJournal of Strategic Studies (2017 and2011Comparative Strategy, Journal of Deradicalization, and Studies in Conflict and Terrorism (2010 and 2011). In 2016, he was awarded a SSHRC Insight Development Grant to study state and non-state cyber deterrence in Canada. In 2017, he was awarded funding from the Department of National Defence, Policy Horizons Canada, and CSIS to organize a workshop on strategic foresight in national security policy.  Prior to joining NPSIA, Professor Wilner held a variety of positions at Policy Horizons Canada (the Government of Canada’s foresight laboratory), the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto, the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START) at the University of Maryland, and the ETH Zurich in Switzerland.